It’s Time to Fire Your Boss_Part I

Humans are wired from birth to be independent. We develop motor coordination and go from crawling to walking and from walking to running. We learn how to ride our bicycles without training wheels. We learn to drive a vehicle without the constant supervision of a driving instructor. We study at tertiary educational institutions with the hope of becoming independent critical thinkers.

But for some inexplicable reason, when it comes to our careers, we are trained (almost instinctively) to be dependent on an employer. Without a second thought, we place total control of our financial future in the hands of a corporation—a corporation that most likely does not give a damn about whether or not we win.

To be entirely dependent on any employer, hoping that the organization will cater to your personal and professional future interests is a risk that should be considered carefully and wisely.

A few years ago, I saw a film that was set in a world where everyone told the absolute truth. People said what was on their minds without inhibition or embarrassment. The beginning of the film was painful to watch because of people’s brutal honesty with each other.

I imagine that people desire to work at an organization that treats them with dignity, respect and as valued and contributing members of society.

There’s a scene where a lady, talking to the parents of a newborn, nonchalantly stated, “Oh, your baby is so ugly, it’s like a little rat.” Another person, who was having a telephone conversation with his employer, said, “Look, I’m not coming in to work today! No, I’m not sick. I just hate it there.”

How many of you feel exactly like that guy? Your job sucks, and showing up to work isn’t any fun. Guess what? You are not alone. According to a recent Gallup survey, most employees hate their jobs.

Why is it that over half of the workforce hate their jobs? Well, here’s why. Employees are tired of the token gestures and tactics employers use to pacify them until the next pay period. Workers are fed up with unfair and often harsh working conditions at their places of employment. Team members are dissatisfied with being bounced around their jobs for years without a promotion or substantial pay increase. A great majority of the labor force is simply sick and tired of being treated like an object.

I do not suppose that people wake up in the morning with made-up minds to resign themselves to the drudgery of a job that does not give a flip about them. I imagine that people desire to work at an organization that treats them with dignity, respect and as valued and contributing members of society.

Too often, the place where you work is a cold and thankless business—a merchant of greed. Many of you are probably nodding your heads in agreement. Deep down you are aware that the nature of the relationship between you and your employer is not based on your award-winning personality or good work ethics.

Experience has taught you that your employer is impersonal and calculating. You are keenly aware that your organization is using you to further their financial goals, and once you are no longer considered a valuable asset, you will be discarded—that is, terminated, sacked, fired, let go, canned, dumped, discharged, or made redundant. But you put up with the crap and mistreatment because you need the job in order to pay your bills and keep a roof over your head.

It might seem as if I am being cynical, but I am really not. Don’t believe me? Ask Jim who was unexpectedly let go from his job after working for his company for many years.

Stay tuned for Part II of this series: “It’s Time to Fire Your Boss.”

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21 thoughts on “It’s Time to Fire Your Boss_Part I

  1. Very interesting post! I find it very relatable. These days so many people do not enjoy their jobs anymore but just feel as though they have no option but to continue going in to a place they are unhappy with as they need the job to pay the bills. I work for a fairly large organization and have seen people that have given 20 + years of their life to the company to just be let go with no notice, it truly is sad as you would expect a certain amount of respect in return for all of your committed time given. Sometimes we just have to look past the simple day to day living and think do I really want to give all my time and effort to somewhere I am unhappy with or should I take a risk to be happy by pursuing my passion. Sometimes security can be gone instantly!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I love your second option…”take a risk to be happy by pursuing my passion.” And as you suggested, job security is a relic of the past. I personally recommend to anyone who’s not risk averse to start a business that’s centered on his or her passion, skill & ability. It just makes sense to bet on oneself rather than relying on an organization that does not have your best interest.

      Liked by 1 person

      • So interesting that you say that! “makes more sense to bet on oneself rather than relying on an organization”

        Great statement and while reading this it makes perfect sense to be able to rely on yourself the most it is so crazy how many of us prefer to put our future in the hands of others. Again, referring back to myself! I have kinda been hanging around trying to prove myself to my managers in hopes that they would notice and help me move further with my career within the organization and I can say I have now been waiting 3 years. To some, this may not seem long but for where I would like to be it is a long time to be doing the same thing. I would get frustrated but once they gave me a little pep talk and a pat on the back I would be playing right into their hands again…waiting for them to notice my potential.

        This year I am coming to the realization that it is so foolish that I have put my career technically in the hands of someone else to decide how far I get as I have been waiting on them to say when I am ready for the next step. I am hoping this year to find my passion and do that for a living so I can truly be happy. I want to be in charge of how successful I am at a certain stage in my life not how successful someone else thinks I should be. =) Thank you for posting this! Glad to talk to someone that seems to be on the same page as me!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • You’re welcome, and thank you for engaging. You mentioned, “I am hoping this year to find my passion and do that for a living so I can truly be happy.” I’d challenge you to create your passion instead. The reason I say “create” versus “find” is because creating your passion involves putting in the work right away and moving toward the personal security one is after. When a person says s/he is “pursuing” his or her passion, that usually leads to valuable time being wasted waiting for the right opportunity.

        You seem to be a very creative and talented individual – just go all in and make it happen – for YOU! Don’t wait for the “right” moment, because that moment will never come. That’s not just talk, it’s a move I made a couple months ago, and I couldn’t be happier.

        Liked by 1 person

      • =) I think you are right creating is probably the better term as I have been trying to “find” my passion and it has lead no where while I was waiting for it to come to me. I have recently taken a step by starting this blog and in a way I feel that I am creating my passion!

        Thank you so much for your kind words, I look forward to reading more posts from you!! =)

        Liked by 1 person

  2. There are certainly jobs that cause only bad aftertaste. Secondly, we have to consider how big or little the gains are. The most widespread strategy is to pay as little as possible for somebody’s fair work and take as much advantage as possible. Good companies are rare.
    We are seeing in Canada a slightly different problem: there are huge issues with work ethics. People just don’t know what work means. We are seeing that most people simply would rather not work at all. It might be this factor you are writing about: it’s such a terrible job and place that it doesn’t make one want to be there.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Inese, I find myself nodding in agreement with you. Good companies are indeed rare. And there are employees who lack a solid work ethic. It could be that what we are seeing is that employers are not incentivized to pay top salary because they do not believe they are getting an equivalent labor value return from employees. Thanks for pushing the conversation forward. -jh

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  3. Wow. Super honest and insightful. I know many of us don’t want to believe it, but this is the blatant truth. This is especially why it is so important to have your own business doing whatever it is that you like to do and find a way to profit from that. It might be more difficult at first, but probably the safer option (as counterintuitive as that sounds)

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This is on point. A friend of mine works for a tax company. A few weeks ago, she along with other employees attended what they were told was a paid training. Well, when it was time to get paid, they noticed that their check did not reflect the 4 hours of paid training. Come to find out, none of them clocked in their training time so they didn’t paid. However, they were not told that they would need to clock in or sign a sign-in sheet. Go figure?

    Liked by 1 person

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