Execution is Worshiped

Everybody wants to win. Everyone wants a piece of the pie. Everybody wants to make it big. Everyone wants to enjoy unparalleled success. People yearn to live a life that bears some semblance of accomplishment. Every person has a mental picture of his or her successful self. BUT…very few people execute in order for winning to be made manifest.

Why is this? How is it that a person can be consciously aware that by implementing a series of actions, success is inevitable, yet does not take any steps to make the image of the successful self a reality? Is the fear of failure a limiting factor? Could it be that people wait for concrete evidence that a plan will succeed rather than working towards making a plan succeed?

Let’s briefly examine these two factors: fear of failure and concrete evidence. Regarding the fear of failure, I get it. No one wants his or her life to be viewed as a grand joke. No one wants to be an epic failure. No one wants to be a bust, especially in a culture that lauds success as a most important human value.

The reality is, failure is a part of life. And the sooner you accept that, the better able and prepared you’ll be to execute smart actionable strategies that will serve your long-term interests. Another great thing about failure is that failure allows success to reveal itself.

Regarding the concrete evidence factor, success should not be pursued based on tangible proof that an idea will work out. Sometimes, the plans we’re most confident will work, flops. And other times we’re surprised by the forward momentum produced by other less-considered ideas. The point is, winning should be as fun as it is unpredictable, and you should be flexible and adaptable—and enjoy the process.

The most important aspect as it relates to executing your goals is to execute your goals. Your focus should be on execution because execution can lead to extraordinary results. Don’t believe me? Well, just ask Bevel’s Tristan Walker, Twitter’s Evan Williams and Jack Dorsey, Netflix’s Reed Hastings, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, TaskRabbit’s Leah Busque, Virgin’s Sir Richard Branson, Travis Kalanick and Garrett Camp of Uber, Brian Chesky, Joe Gebbia and Nathan Blecharczyk of Airbnb, Facebook’s Mark Zukerberg, and Scholly’s Christopher Gray.

Another great thing about failure is that failure allows success to reveal itself.

Here’s the final facet of execution that I’d like you to consider. When executing, you want to be sure that you are aiming at a specific and carefully selected target. Too broad of an execution strategy could result in missing every target. So, choose that plan, product or service that has the greatest potential to disrupt and revolutionize an industry and drive sustainable financial impact.

In essence, your execution has to be consistent with your vision and commitment to winning. Winning individuals and winning brands execute, and do so consistently and in manner that gives them a competitive advantage. Remember there is no winning unless there is first execution.

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